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What Are College Recovery Programs?

ANSWER:

Laurie Handelman
Naperville, IL
(630) 276-6005
lauriehandelman@gmail.com
http://www.recoveryschools.org

Collegiate Recovery Programs

• Approximately 20 Collleges in the Nation have On Campus Recovery Programs
• Listing of schools can be found at www.recoveryschools.org and is published by the Association of Recovery Schools

What you should look for in a collegiate recovery program:

• On Campus Recovery Programs should be well established with a dedicated dormitory on campus for students in recovery
• On Campus Recovery Programs should offer support services such as addiction counseling, 12 step Meetings and Sober Events
• A Sober Community on campus with Sober Fun is key!
• Access to Young People’s AA meetings in the town where the college is located is a huge plus

Sober Dormitory vs On Campus Recovery Program:

What is a sober dorm?
• Sober Dorms are not on campus recovery programs
• Sober dorms require an oath by the student to not use drugs or alcohol in the dorm
• Students living in a sober dorm are not necessarily in recovery.
• Sober dorms do not offer support services for students in recovery

Benefits of a Collegiate Recovery Program:
• On Campus Recovery Programs DO offer the critical support services and community for the student in recovery
• Living with other students in a collegiate recovery setting will offer the sober community your student needs to navigate the college path successfully

Augsburg College and the Step-up Program:

• Augsburg College is a private, four year, liberal arts college in the heart of Minneapolis
• Augsburg has had an On Campus Recovery Program for 16 years.
• The recovery program at Augsburg is called the Step-up Program
• The Step up Program offers students in recovery a dedicated recovery dormitory that is state of the art
• The Step up Program is a community of accountability and support for the student in recovery
• Visit their website at www.augsburg.edu for information on Augsburg College
• Visit the website www.augsburg.edu/stepup/ for information on the Step-up Program at Augsburg
• Excellent article online by Recovery Campus highlighting Augsburg’s Step-up Program can be found at http://RecoveryCampus.com/a-shared-mission/

Posted in: All Categories, Drugs & Alcohol

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What Exactly Is This Design Called the 12 Steps? Can It Be Summed Up Simply?

ANSWER:

Michael Mark
Life Coach
Interventionist
Instructor
Seminar Leader
(630) 484-0574
www.SustenanceMJM.com
www.SystemicRecovery.com
MichaelJMark@att.net

What exactly is this design called the 12 Steps? Can it be summed up simply in a way that’s understandable? How exactly do the steps help people, and what does it mean to “work” them?

The ultimate fallacy of this simple design is that it’s anything other than simple. This remarkably powerful design has been watered down and skewed in so many ways over the years that in most corners of the organization, it has become virtually unrecognizable in comparison to the revolutionary paradigm created by a small group of alcoholics in the 1930’s. Tune in to get a easily graspable bird’s eye view of what this singular design for living has to offer.

Posted in: All Categories, Drugs & Alcohol

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How Can Animal Assisted Therapy Help My Child Who Finds Counseling Very Stressful?

ANSWER:

Elizabeth Duke, Psy.D., TRI, ESMHL, Registered Therapy Animal Handler
Post Doctoral Resident
Samaritan Interfaith Counseling Center
(630) 357-2456 ext. 112
eduke@samaritancenter.org

Most often you hear about Animal Assisted Therapy, or AAT, associated with dogs visiting people in hospitals, or doing Reading with Rover programs. These are incredibly beneficial services today about animals in AAT in counseling has two basic requirements, a mental health professional and a certified therapy animal.

AAT can be a non traditional way help kids and teens get the benefits of therapy by lowering the anxiety and stress around coming to “therapy” or “counseling.” First and foremost, research has shown that petting a dog increases happy bonding hormones in both dogs and humans! So when there’s a dog in the room, your child is likely to become more relaxed just by sitting down and petting the dog. You can imagine how helpful this can be when a kid has to talk about something that really makes them nervous – just pet the dog and you have an automatic stress reducer; that way we can talk about the difficult things sooner and with more honesty. Often having a dog or horse present is a great way to break the ice, for kids that are on the shy side, talking about the dog is a great way to start building a trusting relationship.

Maybe your teen has some negative ideas of what it means to go to therapy? AAT can provide the opportunity to move therapy outdoors and into nature; Some kids and teens might find taking a therapy dog on a walk (which by the way can give therapists tons of information to work with) or heading out to the barn to work with a horse in the arena much less intimidating than going to the office for traditional therapy.

My favorite part of AAT is how it provides the opportunity to practice what we talk about. Relationships with animals are transparent and feedback from animals rarely offends us; with the help of a skilled therapist animal-human interactions can be used to promote healing and growth in your child.

Posted in: All Categories, Anxiety & Stress

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Does My Teen Need a Therapist or a Substance Abuse Facility?

ANSWER:

Dana Wagner, PsyD CADC
Samaritan Interfaith Counseling Center
1819 Bay Scott Circle, Suite 109
Naperville, IL 60540
(630) 357-2456 ext. 34
dwagner@samaritancenter.org

Start by determining if use has been going on a short time or not. Do listen to your gut instincts. You know when your teen came home looking off and started spending too much time alone or with peers. Next, you need to know what substances are being used on a regular basis and which ones that have been tried a handful of times. Most, if not all teens will be reluctant to accurately tell you how much and how often they use. Shame and fear will minimize what is disclosed.

Drug testing is a good idea. Please consult someone on how to best do this, as teens are tricky and it’s an art and a science. A good addiction therapist can tell you how and where to do drug testing in your community. The longer your teen has been using and the frequency of use (not necessarily the type of substance) will indicate whether or not a substance abuse facility is needed.

Please know that it’s important to stay with the process, which may last a full year. Otherwise, you will be looking at repeated treatment services just to help facilitate a desire to stop using. Do have your teen evaluated for mental health problems so that issues like depression, anxiety and/or self esteem, do not create relapse situations that become long detours versus a bump in the road. Thanks for clicking on this link. If you are a parent facing this issue, please seek a professional who is good with teenagers and has a CADC (certification in alcohol and drug treatment).

Posted in: All Categories, Drugs & Alcohol

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What Are the Factors That Can Cause Drug/Treatment Centers to Fall Short?

ANSWER:

Michael Mark
Life Coach
Interventionist
Instructor
Seminar Leader
(630) 484-0574
www.SustenanceMJM.com
www.SystemicRecovery.com
MichaelJMark@att.net

Treatment centers, by definition, seek to rehabilitate. The word means “restoring to a previous condition.” The solution for a real addict is not generally found in any past condition of their lives- as it is usually that condition which led them to begin using in the first place. The addict requires fundamental internal change, a genuinely new design for living, to find true freedom. Many treatment centers are beholden to evidence based modalities, like CBT for example, in that insurance companies will not pay on a spiritually based model which offers no empirical evidence, numbers which can be tracked. Unfortunately, working towards changing ones exterior circumstances and choices in an effort to help them feel better internally, may work in the short term to relieve the behavior driving the addiction, but stands little chance of creating the kind of change necessary to keep the addict from seeking out the exterior answer again once pain and/or suffering return which, of course, they will. Whereas, generating a genuine spiritual change within the addict, literally changing the way they live in and interact with the world, stands a far better chance of not being circumstantially vulnerable in the long term. While many treatment centers advocate for, or even utilize, the 12-Step model, very few elicit a strong understanding of how to employ it properly. They will often demand the individual get a sponsor, without a detailed explanation of what makes an effective sponsor and what things to look for in seeking one. They will tell the individual to work the steps, a design originally meant to be worked with a rapid, consistent cadence, but hold them back from moving beyond step three- even though no change really occurs within the model before step 4. What you often have after 28 days in such an environment, is a person with some cursory self-insight as a result of some group work and a handful of individual sessions, a hazy grasp of The 12-Steps and a whole lot of tactics and strategies for avoiding relapse through knowledge of the key elements that trigger them and how to survive them. On the whole, you often have little more than an addict with an enhanced, puffed up version of confidence and self-will which has provided them a month or so of sobriety and the possibility of being plugged into the “win” column for the facility, but, unfortunately, maybe not a whole lot more than that.

Posted in: All Categories, Drugs & Alcohol

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What Is Hitting Rock Bottom and Is It Necessary?

ANSWER:

Michael Mark
Life Coach
Interventionist
Instructor
Seminar Leader
(630) 484-0574
www.SustenanceMJM.com
www.SystemicRecovery.com
MichaelJMark@att.net

There is no singular definition for bottom. The reason for this is that, ultimately, someone’s “bottom” does not, fundamentally speak to an external condition so much as an internal one. This explains why one person can hit a bottom while still maintaining his family, job, home, etc while, for another, they fail to find their bottom without the assistance of homelessness, incarceration or severe injury. For most addicts, until they internally grasp true powerlessness, that is to say that until the denial-laden idea that there is some way to fix this themselves breaks open, they are doomed to stave on. In large part, it is generally true, that as strong a hold as the substance has on them, the stubborn thought that, through some concoction of their intelligence, competence, resources and will power, they can fix this, holds even stronger. This is why, if you’ve got a child who has taken some kind of step toward sobriety, only to find themselves using again, this is not always a bad thing. A scary thing; yes. A dangerous thing; yes. But it may still be a step toward their ultimate wellness; though it may look like anything but. A person who gets sober but holds onto the idea that, eventually, given the right amount of time and/or circumstances, might be able to do it “right,” in most cases, has done little more than booked a reservation for a relapse somewhere down the road. If that person needs to a few more trips to debauchery to conclusively see that this, is, and always will be, beyond their ability to control, it may ending up being well worth it.

Posted in: All Categories, Drugs & Alcohol

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How Can You Motivate A High School Student to Do Well in High School When They Just Aren’t Interested in School?

ANSWER:

Neil Gorman, MSW, LCSW
Psychodynamic Therapist
Edgewood Clinical Services
2948 Artesian Rd, Suite 112
Naperville, IL 60564
(630) 428-7890
Neil@edgewoodclinicalservices.com

While often overlooked, the importance of simply being a receptive listener can help increase a child’s motivation. Listening is especially important when a parent has asked a question. Frequently it is very tempting to interrupt a child answering a question we have asked, however motivation can be significantly decreased by interruption.

In addition to this it is very important for parents who are listening to remember that there’s going to be much about their child’s experience on which they are not experts, but one of the best ways to become more informed as to listen to the child speak.

Posted in: All Categories, Schoolwork & Competition

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My Children Won’t Stop Fighting. What Should I Do?

ANSWER:

Camila Salvisberg, MA, LPC
Bilingual Therapist
Edgewood Clinical Services
2948 Artesian Rd, Suite 112

Naperville, IL 60564
(630) 428-7890 ext. 324
camila@edgewooclinicalservices.com
www.edgewoodclinicalservices.com

Parents need to remember that occasional fighting and arguing among siblings is normal. There are many ways in which parents can deal with sibling rivalry; here are two simple but important rules that can keep fighting to a minimum:

• Whenever possible, do not intervene in the children’s fights. Give children the chance to try and use conflict resolution skills.

• Do not ask children “Who did it?” When parents do not focus on blaming or punishing they are giving their children an opportunity to take responsibility for their own actions.

RESPUETA:

Camila Salvisberg, MA, LPC
Terapeuta Bilingüe
Edgewood Clinical Services
2948 Artesian Rd, Suite 112
Naperville, IL 60564
(630) 428-7890 ext. 324
camila@edgewooclinicalservices.com
www.edgewoodclinicalservices.com

Los padres deben recordar que las peleas y discusiones entre hermanos son normales. Hay muchas maneras por las cuales los padres pueden lidiar con las peleas entre hermanos; estas son dos simples pero importantes medidas que pueden tomar para fomentar la paz en su hogar y ayudar a que sus hijos se lleven bien:

• Siempre que sea posible, no intervenir en las peleas de los niños. Dar a los niños la oportunidad de resolver el conflicto.

• No le pregunte a los niños “¿Quién lo hizo?” Cuando los padres no se centran en culpar o castigar al niño, le están dando la oportunidad de asumir responsabilidad sobre sus propias
acciones.

Posted in: All Categories, Family & Relationships

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What Are the Dangers of Allowing Underage Drinking in My Home?

ANSWER:

Commander Ken Parcel
Naperville Police Department
1350 Aurora Avenue
Naperville, Il 60540
parcelk@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5485

Parents need to know the dangers of allowing underage drinking in their home:

Underage Drinking is Illegal: It is a crime in Illinois and under City ordinance:

It is a CRIMINAL Offense for parents to allow minors, or anyone under the age of 21, to drink at ANY property they own, including homes, cabins, boats, lakes, or campgrounds.

Parents Face Civil Liability:

Parent or legal guardian is liable for damages for WILLFUL or MALICIOUS acts of their child.
Theft, vandalism, fighting, injuries, sexual assaults, property destruction, etc.

Parents Have a Moral responsibility:
The job of a parent is to help your kids navigate the decision making process AND intervene and stop them when those decisions can have drastic and potentially deadly consequences. Expectations, boundaries, and limits are good.

Kids have heard and been taught “Just Say No”! Parenting is TOUGH- Parents MUST be up the challenge to “Just Say No” when it matters most.

  • Be Aware and look around
  • Use your all your senses; ask questions, challenge their answers… Trust BUT Verify
  • Reach Out. We are a community of many resources.

Posted in: All Categories, Drugs & Alcohol, Family & Relationships

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How Can I Learn About and Respond to Mental Health Problems Students Are Facing Today?

ANSWER:

Janice Rubin
Director of Family Life – Student Ministries
Good Shepherd Church
Naperville, IL 60565
(630) 961-9220 ext. 3014

Mental Health issues affect all of society in some way, shape, or form. It’s estimated that one in four Americans will have a diagnosable mental disorder at some point in their lives. That’s right, ¼ of our population. It is extremely likely that you will encounter someone in your family, workplace, school, church, or community who lives with a diagnosed mental disorder. The truth is that mental health problems are more common than heart disease, lung disease, and cancer combined.

Wouldn’t you love to:

  • dispel the stigma and discrimination of mental illness
  • and be able to offer support to someone in distress
  • be a source in helping person seek further assistance

Gaining knowledge and skills is valuable. It is important to understand that wellness and recovery are possible. If this seems like a daunting task, let’s think about it in terms of basic first aid.
Knowledge and skills serve us well in navigating an emergency and can potentially prevent a medical emergency through early intervention. In 2001, MHFA Training and Research Program was
developed in Australia and since has been updated for use in the U. S.

Mental Health First Aid is a groundbreaking public education program that helps the public identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders.
MHFA is an 8 hour training course designed to teach lay people methods of assisting someone who may be in the early stages of developing a mental health problem or in a mental health crisis.

I encourage you to become certified in MHFA by going through the interactive 8 hour course that:

  • presents an overview of mental illness & substance use disorders in the U.S.
  •  introduces participants to risk factors & warning signs
  •  builds understanding of their impact, and
  • overviews common treatments.

Those who become certified as Mental Health First Aiders learn a  5-step action plan encompassing the skills, resources and knowledge to help an individual in crisis connect with appropriate professional,
peer, social, and self-help care. Check out the MHFA website where you will that the course is offered in many locations and times. Wellness and recovery matter. You can be a part of the solution.
To register for the MHFA course, contact:
Barry Groesch, Mental Health First Aid Community Liaison
Linden Oaks at Edward Hospital, Naperville, IL
(630) 646-5154
Click Here for MHFA Course Info Online

Posted in: All Categories, Anxiety & Stress, Depression & Self Harm

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