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How Do You Help Your Teen Manage Peer Pressure in High School or College?

ANSWER:

Cheryl Frommelt MS LCPC LMFT
Clinical Director, Fox Valley Institute for Growth and Wellness
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist
Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor
Fox Valley Institute for Growth and Wellness
640 N. River Rd. Suite 108
Naperville, IL 60563
(630) 718-0717 x 210
cheryl@fvinstitute.com
www.fvinstitute.com

How Do You Help Your Teen Manage Peer Pressure in High School or College?

Peers naturally influence our teen’s lives. The influence can be either positive or negative in nature. It is human nature to listen to and learn from
others in their age group. As kids get older, in high school and college, negative peer pressure can get in the way academically, behaviorally or
emotionally.

Let’s discuss 5 ways to help your teen manage peer pressure in high school
and beyond.

1. Encourage your child to take part in positive activities with positive
people that they can feel good about.
2. Listen to your child when they talk to you about peer situations. Don’t
overreact, lecture, shame or blame them.
3. Teach your child to foresee potential situations that may lead to trouble
and role-play saying “no”.
4. Get to know your child’s friends.
5. Develop a back-up plan when your child is in a situation they can’t handle.

Posted in: Peer Pressure, Schoolwork & Competition

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What Is Resiliency? How Can I Model It for My Child?

ANSWER:

Dawn Neylon
Power of Choice 6-8th Grade Coordinator
360 Youth Services
1305 W. Oswego Road
Naperville, IL 60540
dneylon@360youthservices.org
(630) 961-2992 ext. 232
www.360youthservices.org
www.ThePowerofChoice.info

What Is Resiliency? How Can I Model It for My Child?

The American Psychological Association defines resilience as “the ability to adapt well to adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or even significant sources of stress”.

Being resilient doesn’t mean our children won’t face adversity or stress, but resiliency skills will help them process these challenges and grow stronger.
Resilient individuals are also less likely to abuse alcohol or drugs and more likely to experience success in all aspects of life.

Five factors that influence resilience:

1. Sense of humor- being able to laugh in the face of difficulty lowers stress levels and allows a child to overcome the situation more quickly.
2. Problem solving skills – looking at a difficult situation as a problem that can be solved allows a child to feel empowered.
3. Sense of future- when a child can imagine life beyond current circumstances and see himself in that future situation, it makes those circumstances less daunting.
4. Social competence- children who feel comfortable navigating social situations are less likely to find themselves in confrontational situations.
5. Mentors- positive adult role models present in a child’s life help to model appropriate responses to situations. These don’t have to be long-term contacts; they can be people who are influential for days, weeks, months or years—all positive adult contacts have benefit.

We can all cultivate resilience, both in ourselves and in our children. As parents we model healthy coping and resiliency on a daily basis.

Posted in: Anxiety & Stress

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What Do I Do if My Child Doesn’t Want to Go to School?

ANSWER:

Jamie Little, MSW
Class of 2017 Social Worker
Neuqua Valley High School
(630) 428-6418
jamie_little@ipsd.org

What Do I Do if My Child Doesn’t Want to Go to School?

It’s normal if your child doesn’t want to go to school once in a while. It becomes a problem when they are refusing to go to school. Most of the time, there is some type of anxiety behind refusing to go to school. That anxiety can be for many reasons. A good person to initially contact at the school if you feel that your child is refusing to go school is either the school social worker or guidance counselor. Sometimes, just having a meeting with that person, yourself, and the child can help. Getting the student into the building is very important. If for some reason the child continues to refuse, there are different programs out there that will do an assessment to see the level of anxiety/refusal; places like Alexian Brothers, Central DuPage Hospital, and Linden Oaks are just a few.

Posted in: Schoolwork & Competition

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How Do I Identify the Pills I Found in my Child’s Room?

ANSWER:

Chief Bob Marshall
Naperville Police Department
(630) 420-6161
www.naperville.il.us
marshallr@naperville.il.us
First Step Program – DuPage County
(630) 407-2100

 

This is a question the Naperville Police Department fields frequently. Two options immediately come to mind:

1. The first option is to confront your child and ask your child: Where did you get these pills, who did you get them from, and do you know what these pills are for?

2. The second option is a program that’s available through DuPage County, through their Crime Lab. It’s called the First Step Program. The Program allows parents to anonymously call the DuPage County Crime Lab and give a description of the item the parent is questioning whether it be pills, a powdery substance, or a leafy substance. What happens then is that the Crime Lab will provide direction to the parents and they don’t need to leave their name, address or number. The Crime Lab will analyze that material and communicate the contents directly to the parents. We are assured that there are no legal ramifications for calling the Crime Lab and asking them to identify that substance.

Those are two options that are available to parents in DuPage County and specifically the Naperville community if they come across some pills or substances in their child’s room or in their child’s possession and they may not know exactly what it is.

Posted in: Drugs & Alcohol

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